Additional Information

 Because studies have proposed a relation between sleep duration and obesity, there has been much interest in assessing the impact of sleep on energy intakes. Studies have shown that short sleepers have higher energy intakes, notably from fat and snacks, than do normal sleepers.  NHANES data in the United States showed that short sleepers, generally defined as those who sleep less than 7 hour/night, consume a smaller variety of foods, with lower protein, carbohydrate, fiber, and fat intakes relative to normal sleepers who report 7–8 hour of sleep/night. These data are corroborated by clinical intervention studies that also showed greater snack intakes during periods of sleep restriction relative to habitual sleep in normal sleepers. Fat was also highlighted as a macronutrient of choice during periods of sleep restriction relative to habitual sleep.

Our Meals Are Designed Keeping in mind all these points.